15 Things That Happen When Your Child is Obsessed With Dinosaurs

If you have a kid who’s really into dinosaurs, you know that just saying they “like” them is not merely enough. My son, for example, was completely and totally obsessed with dinosaurs for at least three years of his life. I think it started the very moment he laid his tiny toddler eyes on his very first T-Rex. It must have been love at first sight. And from then on, it was all he would ever talk about and think about. We had all the books, toys, stuffed animals, movies, TV shows, clothes, EVERYTHING. It was just dinosaurs, dinosaurs, dinosaurs for his entire toddlerhood and beyond.

Now that he’s a big boy of six whole years, he’s moved on quite a bit. Video game characters seem to be all the rage these days, but I know his prehistoric pals will always have a special place in his heart. And, holy crap,  I can’t even believe what I’m about to say, but I actually kind of miss those dinosaur days. He drove me a little insane sometimes with the whole obsession, but looking back, it was pretty damn adorable.

If your little T-Rex head is, or was, anything like mine used to be, then you’ll relate to most (if not all) of these things:

  1. You’ve learned that there is no such thing as a brontosaurus, and apparently there never was. Yup, your science teacher was dead wrong. Nowadays it’s all about the brachiosaurus.
  2. You notice that Dino Dan is clearly on some very powerful hallucinogens, but we’re supposed to just accept it and watch the show anyway, no questions asked
  3. Your visit to the Museum of Natural History starts on the fourth floor, where all the cool dinosaur bones are. Don’t kid yourselves into thinking you came to see anything else (except maybe the giant blue whale- he’s pretty damn cool).
  4. You are way better at correctly pronouncing loooooong dinosaur names than you ever thought, thanks to the little lesson in phonetics under each name. At this point, there is nothing you can’t properly sound out. Micropachycephalosaurus? Epidexipteryx? Xinjiangovenator? Bring it on.
  5. You can never have too many dinosaur encyclopedias. And no, there is no limit to how many pages you’ll be asked to read every night.
  6. Shopping for kids clothes in a store with not even a single dinosaur tee shirt in sight is a complete waste of time.
  7. You will happily pay an inexcusable amount of money for any article of clothing with a really cool-looking T-Rex on it.
  8. Three years old is not at all too young to watch Jurassic Park for the first time.
  9. Barney does NOT count as a dinosaur. Never has, never will. Thank you, lord.
  10. There is no storage bin spacious enough for your child’s vast toy dinosaur collection. And every time you attempt to close the lid, there’s at least one tail sticking out somewhere preventing you from doing so. Better luck next time.
  11. People like to say it’s just a “childhood phase”, which you find hilarious. What kind of “phase” lasts at least THREE YEARS?? We prefer the term “healthy obsession”.
  12. Your child learned the difference between a carnivore and an herbivore before he knew his ABC’s.
  13. You saved money on Halloween costumes, because he (or she!) just wants to be T-Rex every year.
  14. Playing “pretend” has taken on a whole new meaning in your house; there are days that your child won’t answer to anything but “T-Rex”, and you occasionally have to explain to random strangers why your child is roaring very loudly at them for no reason.
  15. You wonder if the dinosaur obsession might continue beyond childhood, and your little one will might even someday choose a career in paleontology. And then you can’t help but think of Ross from Friends.
roar

So. Much. Roaring.

 

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9 thoughts on “15 Things That Happen When Your Child is Obsessed With Dinosaurs

  1. HAHAHA!!! This is so my son and he’s been in this “healthy obsession” for a few years now. I definitely think of Ross from Friends whenever I think of his future.

  2. this is so my son , 3 years in and he is still as obsessed he’s 6 now and not looking like its waning at all , tickets are booked for jurassic world on friday , will he be the youngest person in the cinema i wonder

  3. My grandson at age 6 was so nto dinasaurs that he could not hear his teacher talk due to his day dreaming about dinasaurs. We decided to removed every thing related to dinasaurs out of the house. The obsession may not be as bad now. Not sure if he is still day dreaming about them and not telling us.

    • That’s terrible why would you destroy such a great childhood love that your child has. Let him explore and enjoy whatever he chooses, he is not hurting anyone.

  4. My son’s is teetering on the unhealthy side. It is affecting his ability to be social with other kids. All he wants to do is roar loudly in their faces. It scares other kids and he ends up alienating himself. Not to mention embarass the hell out of me. I’ve tried everything to curb this behavior and am afraid this “phase” isn’t letting up anytime soon. Any suggestions?? Help!

  5. My son is about to turn seven. The dinosaur obsession has been in place since he first met them at preschool, age three. It shows no signs of abating, and at one point he told me to stop singing, because it distracts him from the dinosaurs, and without the dinosaurs he’s not himself. He’s informed me he’s going to university to study paleontology, then to live in Mongolia, to study velociraptors for his doctoral thesis, then his life’s work will be to be the first paleontologist to find a complete mosasaur skeleton. Apparently mosasaurs didn’t chew their food, they shredded it on their upper palate. Just so you know. Apparently I needed to be informed of this crucial fact.

    For those who wonder if their child’s knowledge and interest is excessive and unhealthy, well, perhaps. Obsessional hobbies, interests, and behaviours are a marker for autism spectrum disorders. They can also be a coping mechanism for childhood trauma. An obsession with dinosaurs is also an early marker for giftedness in maths and science – logical intelligence – so it’s worth having a qualified psychologist assess your child if you do have concerns.

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